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UPDATED WITH STATEMENT FROM SUNTECH:

Trina Solar, Yingli Green Energy and Suntech have pledged to defend themselves against thin-film PV manufacturer Solyndra's claims that the Chinese companies "conspired" to destroy Solyndra.

The three companies were named in a lawsuit filed by Solyndra last week. Solyndra has claimed that China's module manufacturers, banks, polysilicon suppliers and other parties illegally partnered to flood the U.S. market with low-cost solar modules, undermining Solyndra's business.

In a statement, Trina insists the lawsuit is "without merit" and says it will "vigorously defend itself against the baseless allegations in the complaint."

Robert Petrina, managing director of Yingli Green Energy Americas, issued a similar take on the lawsuit. "We just received notice of this complaint, but from our initial review, these are unwarranted and misguided claims from a company that has a clear history of failed technology and achievements," Petrina said in a statement.

E. L. "Mick" McDaniel, managing director of Suntech America, called Solyndra's allegations "baseless."

"Though we are continuing to review the complaint, it is obvious that this lawsuit is a misguided effort by Solyndra to find scapegoats for its failure to commercialize its technology at a competitive price point," he said in a statement emailed to Solar Industry.





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