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Los Angeles Cleantech Incubator (LACI), a private nonprofit founded by the City of Los Angeles to accelerate the commercialization of clean technologies in the Los Angeles region, has added five new companies to its roster, including two solar firms.

The first new addition is Skyline Innovations Inc., which finances, installs, maintains and monitors commercial-scale solar water heating systems at no upfront cost to customers. The company specializes in service to buildings that use more than 2,500 gallons of water daily and offers real-time system monitoring to its customers.

The second is Open Neighborhoods, a provider of solar energy buying services. The company procures residential and commercial solar energy via online bidding and shopping comparison services. Open Neighborhoods has also developed SunShopper, an online platform for the integration of geospatial solar mapping data.

LACI offers its member companies flexible office space, CEO coaching and mentoring, and access to a network of experts and capital.



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