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Ideal Power Converters (IPC), a developer of electronic power converter solutions, says its 30 kW battery converter has been certified for UL 1741 conformance. The certification for UL 1741 ensures safety and grid compatibility for distributed generation technology in North America, according to the company.

IPC has invented and patented indirect Energy Packet Switching topology that uses a standard lightweight hardware design and embedded application-specific software to serve the power conversion market. IPC's initial focus is on photovoltaic, grid storage, and electric vehicle charging infrastructure applications.

"Battery converters can contribute up to half the energy efficiency losses and costs in grid storage systems," says Paul Bundschuh, CEO of Ideal Power Converters. "IPC's battery converter provides both battery charging and inverter functions with higher efficiency and lower installed cost, thereby improving the economic value of battery storage."



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