in News Departments > New & Noteworthy
print the content item

comments: 0

First Solar and Suntech led in PV module manufacturing in 2011, with both reaching approximately 2 GW of module production, according to Lux Research's latest Solar Supply Tracker.

Crystalline silicon module prices continue to be at a record low, the report adds. Tier-one manufacturers are selling at around $0.90/W, while tier-two and tier-three manufacturers have sold product at even lower rates in order to burn through their inventories and survive the current market conditions.

The top 10 companies added up to 12.5 GW of module production - 44% of the 2011 total global module production. 

Sharp, a Japanese module manufacturer, and Hanwha, a South Korean module manufacturer, have reached the top 10. Heightened interest in both countries to increase the share of photovoltaic generated power in their energy infrastructure was triggered both by the Fukushima nuclear disaster and competition with China, which continues to support its photovoltaic industry, Lux Research explains.

Another notable Japanese company - Solar Frontier, a manufacturer of copper indium selenide modules - has consistently ranked in the global top 25 module manufacturers since the second quarter of 2011.

"Expect to see a major rise in market share from Japanese and Korean suppliers, while European module manufacturers struggle with financial woes and reduced government incentives for solar in Europe," says Fatima Toor, a research analyst at Lux Research.

First Solar ranked No. 1 in global module production, with 7% of global market share and 2,001 MW of production in 2011. Suntech Power followed, with 6.5% of global market share and 1,866 MW of production. Yingli Green Energy came in third, with 5.5% of global market share and 1,554 MW of production.

Trina Solar, Canadian Solar, Sharp, Hanwha Solar One, Jinko Solar, LDK Solar and SolarWorld round out the Top 10.



IronRidge_id1414

ModSolar_A_id1434
Latest Top Stories

TVA Reconsiders Solar's Role And Value In New Resource Plan And Grid Study

Critics point to wide variations in caps and premiums paid for solar under the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) current plan. The utility agency says it will incorporate more solar stakeholders in future programs.


After Massachusetts' 'Godfather Of Solar' Exits, Will The New Gov. Step Up?

Bay State solar developers and suppliers look back on the legacy of Gov. Deval Patrick while awaiting Massachusetts’ incoming chief executive.


Do PV Customers Benefit From Incentive Programs In California?

Government incentives, such as the California Solar Initiative, have been instrumental in the growth of the photovoltaic industry over the past decade. Researchers have studied the degree to which these incentives have been passed on to PV customers.


Volatility Creeping Into Mass. Solar Sector Shakes Up Larger Developers

Players in the so-called "managed growth" sector of the commonwealth - 6 MW and larger - are concerned that the field keeps shifting under their feet.


New UL Energy Storage Standard Aims For Better, Safer Renewable Power

As the Talking Heads said, "Things fall apart. It's scientific." UL is turning its scientific study of how and why things fail to produce a testing and certification regime for building better renewable energy grids.

Heilind_id1430
Lufft_id1410
GoIndustry (UK) Limited_id1446
Ingeteam_id1433
PVcobra_id1394